Welcome to ASMI2021

The ASMI 2021 conference committee would like to wholeheartedly welcome you to the 6th Annual Scientific Symposium hosted by the Australian Society of Molecular Imaging (ASMI). We’re bringing together researchers from a wide range of disciplines interested in the development and application of multi-modality molecular imaging.
Check out the Program for more details.

We expect to host around 150 researchers from fundamental and applied areas of chemistry, biology, imaging, and clinical research. Early career researchers and higher degree students are welcomed – check the Registration page for information on submitting an abstract. Don’t forget there will be awards for best oral and poster presentation, so be sure to submit your abstract before the deadline!

ASMI 2021 will be held via Zoom and in person at the Translational Research Institute (TRI) in Woollongabba, Queensland from Monday 21 to Tuesday 22 June 2021 with a special UQ Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI) Workshop on 23 June 2021. The Logistics page contains venue, accommodation, tourism, and more useful information for planning your visit to Brisbane.

Key Dates

  • Abstracts and Registrations open
    Monday 8th February
  • Abstract submission closes
    ~closed~
  • Registration closes
    Monday 7th June
  • ASMI2021 begins
    Monday 21st June

Plenary Speakers

Prof Liu BinNational University of Singapore

Professor Liu Bin, Provost’s Chair, was appointed Vice President (Research and Technology) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) on 1 September 2019. She has been the Head of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering since July 2017.

Liu Bin graduated with a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Nanjing University, and PhD in Chemistry from NUS. She had postdoctoral training at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She joined NUS as an Assistant Professor in 2005, and was promoted to full Professorship in 2016.

Liu Bin is a leader in the field of organic functional materials, who has been well-recognised for her contributions in polymer chemistry and applications of organic nanomaterials for biomedical research, environmental monitoring and energy devices. She is named among the World's Most Influential Minds and the Top 1% Highly Cited Researchers in Materials Science by Thomson Reuters and Clarivate Analytics. She is a prolific researcher with over 350 publications and holds 30 patents with 16 of them licensed to different companies in US, UK and Asia. In 2014, she co-founded Luminicell, an NUS spin-off company that produces organic luminescent nanoparticles for use in medical and biological applications.

Liu Bin has an impressive list of accolades to her name, including the National Science and Technology Young Scientist Award 2008, L'Oréal Women in Science National Fellowship in 2011 and the 2016 President’s Technology Award. Most recently, she was awarded the prestigious 2019 American Chemical Society ACS Nano Lectureship Award, which honors three award recipients from around the world who have significantly impacted the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Liu Bin is a Fellow of the Singapore Academy of Engineering, Asia Pacific Academy of Materials, and Royal Society of Chemistry. She serves on the editorial advisory boards of more than a dozen top peer-reviewed chemistry and materials journals. Since 2019, she serves as the Deputy Editor to launch and develop ACS Materials Letters, a flagship materials journal of the American Chemical Society. She is passionate about nurturing the next generation research leaders and encouraging more women to pursue careers in science and engineering.

Prof Liu BinNational University of Singapore

Professor Liu Bin, Provost’s Chair, was appointed Vice President (Research and Technology) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) on 1 September 2019. She has been the Head of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering since July 2017.

Liu Bin graduated with a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Nanjing University, and PhD in Chemistry from NUS. She had postdoctoral training at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She joined NUS as an Assistant Professor in 2005, and was promoted to full Professorship in 2016.

Liu Bin is a leader in the field of organic functional materials, who has been well-recognised for her contributions in polymer chemistry and applications of organic nanomaterials for biomedical research, environmental monitoring and energy devices. She is named among the World's Most Influential Minds and the Top 1% Highly Cited Researchers in Materials Science by Thomson Reuters and Clarivate Analytics. She is a prolific researcher with over 350 publications and holds 30 patents with 16 of them licensed to different companies in US, UK and Asia. In 2014, she co-founded Luminicell, an NUS spin-off company that produces organic luminescent nanoparticles for use in medical and biological applications.

Liu Bin has an impressive list of accolades to her name, including the National Science and Technology Young Scientist Award 2008, L'Oréal Women in Science National Fellowship in 2011 and the 2016 President’s Technology Award. Most recently, she was awarded the prestigious 2019 American Chemical Society ACS Nano Lectureship Award, which honors three award recipients from around the world who have significantly impacted the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Liu Bin is a Fellow of the Singapore Academy of Engineering, Asia Pacific Academy of Materials, and Royal Society of Chemistry. She serves on the editorial advisory boards of more than a dozen top peer-reviewed chemistry and materials journals. Since 2019, she serves as the Deputy Editor to launch and develop ACS Materials Letters, a flagship materials journal of the American Chemical Society. She is passionate about nurturing the next generation research leaders and encouraging more women to pursue careers in science and engineering.

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Prof Carolyn MountfordQueensland University of Technology

Professor Carolyn Mountford is an Oxford Educated Biophysicist. She recently stepped down as CEO and Director of Research for Australia’s Translational Research Institute. Carolyn was awarded full Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School in 2011 and retains a position as NeuroScientist at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and Harvard Medical School. She is currently Professor of Radiology at QUT and CEO of a start up DatChem. Professor Mountford and her team have been a worldwide development site for Siemens since 1999. She is a co-inventor of the diagnostic protocol to monitor women at high risk for breast cancer identifying metabolic deregulations in their breast tissue that precede tumour growth. The same technology is shown to identify changes to the brain associated with learning, memory, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and injury from blast and impact. Her team is under contract to the USA and Australian military to develop this approach to improve the health of soldiers.

Image of Carolyn, smiling
Prof Carolyn MountfordQueensland University of Technology

Professor Carolyn Mountford is an Oxford Educated Biophysicist. She recently stepped down as CEO and Director of Research for Australia’s Translational Research Institute. Carolyn was awarded full Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School in 2011 and retains a position as NeuroScientist at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and Harvard Medical School. She is currently Professor of Radiology at QUT and CEO of a start up DatChem. Professor Mountford and her team have been a worldwide development site for Siemens since 1999. She is a co-inventor of the diagnostic protocol to monitor women at high risk for breast cancer identifying metabolic deregulations in their breast tissue that precede tumour growth. The same technology is shown to identify changes to the brain associated with learning, memory, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and injury from blast and impact. Her team is under contract to the USA and Australian military to develop this approach to improve the health of soldiers.

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Prof Kristofer ThurechtUniversity of Queensland

Prof. Kristofer Thurecht graduated from the University of Queensland, Australia, in 2005 with a PhD in polymer chemistry. In 2007, Prof. Thurecht was simultaneously awarded a Ramsay Centenary Fellowship and 1851 Research Fellowship in the UK, and has since held both an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (2008) and an ARC Future Fellowship (2012). In 2015, Prof. Thurecht was awarded the RACI David Sangster Polymer Science and Technology Award from the Polymer Division. Prof. Thurecht is a senior group leader within the Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI) and the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) at the University of Queensland where he currently holds an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (CDF2). His research focusses on developing improved understanding of the nano-bio interface, particularly using molecular imaging tools to address some of the complex questions in this field. His team works across the boundaries of chemistry and materials, biology and imaging science to probe how nanomaterial properties affect their function in living animals. He is a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and theme leader in the ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging and Technology.

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Prof Kristofer ThurechtUniversity of Queensland

Prof. Kristofer Thurecht graduated from the University of Queensland, Australia, in 2005 with a PhD in polymer chemistry. In 2007, Prof. Thurecht was simultaneously awarded a Ramsay Centenary Fellowship and 1851 Research Fellowship in the UK, and has since held both an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (2008) and an ARC Future Fellowship (2012). In 2015, Prof. Thurecht was awarded the RACI David Sangster Polymer Science and Technology Award from the Polymer Division. Prof. Thurecht is a senior group leader within the Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI) and the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) at the University of Queensland where he currently holds an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (CDF2). His research focusses on developing improved understanding of the nano-bio interface, particularly using molecular imaging tools to address some of the complex questions in this field. His team works across the boundaries of chemistry and materials, biology and imaging science to probe how nanomaterial properties affect their function in living animals. He is a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and theme leader in the ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging and Technology.

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A/Prof Michelle JamesStanford University

Dr. James is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Radiology and Neurology, within the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). She received her BS in pharmacology and organic chemistry at the University of Sydney, where she also earned her PhD in radiochemistry/pharmacology and was awarded the University Medal.

For over fifteen years, Dr. James’s research has focused on designing, evaluating, and translating novel molecular imaging agents to improve the way we diagnose, treat, and understand devastating neurological diseases. In particular, she is interested in developing new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers for visualizing neuroinflammation with the goal of learning about the in vivo role, spatiotemporal dynamics, and different functional phenotypes of specific innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Dr. James is also very interested in applying these tools to guide therapeutic selection for individual patients and as imaging biomarkers in clinical trials. As part of her work, Dr. James has multiple patented radiotracers, four of which are currently being used in clinical neuroimaging studies at Stanford and/or around the world. She also cofounded a company called Willow Neuroscience which is focused on developing immunomodulatory therapeutics and novel PET diagnostics for neurodegenerative diseases.

A/Prof Michelle JamesStanford University

Dr. James is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Radiology and Neurology, within the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). She received her BS in pharmacology and organic chemistry at the University of Sydney, where she also earned her PhD in radiochemistry/pharmacology and was awarded the University Medal.

For over fifteen years, Dr. James’s research has focused on designing, evaluating, and translating novel molecular imaging agents to improve the way we diagnose, treat, and understand devastating neurological diseases. In particular, she is interested in developing new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers for visualizing neuroinflammation with the goal of learning about the in vivo role, spatiotemporal dynamics, and different functional phenotypes of specific innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Dr. James is also very interested in applying these tools to guide therapeutic selection for individual patients and as imaging biomarkers in clinical trials. As part of her work, Dr. James has multiple patented radiotracers, four of which are currently being used in clinical neuroimaging studies at Stanford and/or around the world. She also cofounded a company called Willow Neuroscience which is focused on developing immunomodulatory therapeutics and novel PET diagnostics for neurodegenerative diseases.

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Invited Speakers

Prof Gemma FigtreeUniversity of Sydney

Gemma Figtree is a Professor in Medicine at the University of Sydney. She co-leads the Cardiovascular Theme for Sydney Health Partners, a NHMRC Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre and is the Chair of the University of Sydney’s multi-disciplinary Cardiovascular Initiative. Gemma completed her DPhil at Oxford University in 2002 supported by a Rhodes Scholarship making fundamental discoveries regarding estrogen’s actions and factors regulating NO/redox balance in the cardiovascular system. She is committed to improving the care for heart attack patients- using her knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to develop methods of identifying those at highest risk of adverse outcome, and discovering novel therapies to prevent and treat events, inspired by her clinical work as an interventional cardiologist. She has dedicated herself throughout her career to unravelling key mechanisms underlying susceptibility and response to heart attack, with studies extending from the bench to large cohort studies and clinical trials. Discoveries in her Laboratory have been published in leading journals Circulation, JACC and European Heart Journal, with > 140 publications. GF is a principal investigator on grants >$8 mill. Having recently completed a co-funded NHMRC CDF and Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship, she was awarded a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Excellence Award for Top Ranked Practitioner Fellow (Australia), commencing in 2018. In 2019 she received the prestigious NSW Ministerial Award for Cardiovascular Research Excellence. Gemma is committed to the advancement of her field and serves as a member of the Editorial Board of leading international cardiovascular journals Circulation and Cardiovascular Research, as well as being a founding editorial board member for Redox Biology, and an Associate Editor for Heart, Lung and Circulation. Her research and clinical perspective and leadership are recognised by her membership of the Scientific Board of Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (responsible for International Relations), and her appointment to the Expert Advisory Panel for NHMRC Structural Review of Grants Program (2016-17), and as well as the Clinical Committee of the Heart Foundation. She is committed to the promotion and advocacy of cardiovascular research, working as President of the Australian Cardiovascular Alliance with a national team to secure $220 Million Federal funding for the Mission for Cardiovascular Health, as well as a member of the NSW CVD Advisory Committee. She now chairs the Mission (CV) Expert Advisory Panel. She is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and serves/has served as a non-executive Director on multiple community Boards.

Prof Gemma FigtreeUniversity of Sydney

Gemma Figtree is a Professor in Medicine at the University of Sydney. She co-leads the Cardiovascular Theme for Sydney Health Partners, a NHMRC Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre and is the Chair of the University of Sydney’s multi-disciplinary Cardiovascular Initiative. Gemma completed her DPhil at Oxford University in 2002 supported by a Rhodes Scholarship making fundamental discoveries regarding estrogen’s actions and factors regulating NO/redox balance in the cardiovascular system. She is committed to improving the care for heart attack patients- using her knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to develop methods of identifying those at highest risk of adverse outcome, and discovering novel therapies to prevent and treat events, inspired by her clinical work as an interventional cardiologist. She has dedicated herself throughout her career to unravelling key mechanisms underlying susceptibility and response to heart attack, with studies extending from the bench to large cohort studies and clinical trials. Discoveries in her Laboratory have been published in leading journals Circulation, JACC and European Heart Journal, with > 140 publications. GF is a principal investigator on grants >$8 mill. Having recently completed a co-funded NHMRC CDF and Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship, she was awarded a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Excellence Award for Top Ranked Practitioner Fellow (Australia), commencing in 2018. In 2019 she received the prestigious NSW Ministerial Award for Cardiovascular Research Excellence. Gemma is committed to the advancement of her field and serves as a member of the Editorial Board of leading international cardiovascular journals Circulation and Cardiovascular Research, as well as being a founding editorial board member for Redox Biology, and an Associate Editor for Heart, Lung and Circulation. Her research and clinical perspective and leadership are recognised by her membership of the Scientific Board of Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (responsible for International Relations), and her appointment to the Expert Advisory Panel for NHMRC Structural Review of Grants Program (2016-17), and as well as the Clinical Committee of the Heart Foundation. She is committed to the promotion and advocacy of cardiovascular research, working as President of the Australian Cardiovascular Alliance with a national team to secure $220 Million Federal funding for the Mission for Cardiovascular Health, as well as a member of the NSW CVD Advisory Committee. She now chairs the Mission (CV) Expert Advisory Panel. She is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and serves/has served as a non-executive Director on multiple community Boards.

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John Hooper smiling at the camera
Prof John HooperMater Research Institute

Professor John Hooper is a Mater Foundation Fellow and a Senior Research Fellow at Mater Research. John leads the Cancer Cell Biology Research Group and is the author of over 70 publications with his research currently focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying cancer.
John’s lab has a particular interest in aggressive malignancies, including cancers of the prostate, colon/rectum, pancreas and ovary, and works closely with Mater clinicians to identify key areas of need in these malignancies, with an ongoing emphasis on the role in cancer of cell surface receptor systems. The lab’s work is underpinned by molecular, enzymology and cell biology approaches, analysis of human tissues and pre-clinical models of cancer to identify cancer promoting molecular pathways and to test new anti-cancer drugs.
Since 2010, John has helped to drive the establishment of gynaecological, urological and breast cancer research teams at the Mater Hospitals. These are closely aligned with Mater’s clinical multidisciplinary teams and involve surgeons, medical oncologists, pathologists, palliative care physicians, nurses and basic researchers.
John is grateful for the more than $6.5 million in research funding that has supported his research from a range of agencies including the National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Mater Foundation, the Australian Research Council, Cancer Council Queensland, the Wesley Research Institute and The Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia.
My research focus on cancer continues to be motivated by an innate drive to understand the aberrant molecular interactions that cause cells to grow, move and survive in settings where they would normally die. My goal is to develop novel therapies that modulate these interactions in such a way that they result in cancer cell death, tumour regression and improved patient survival and quality of life.’

John Hooper smiling at the camera
Prof John HooperMater Research Institute

Professor John Hooper is a Mater Foundation Fellow and a Senior Research Fellow at Mater Research. John leads the Cancer Cell Biology Research Group and is the author of over 70 publications with his research currently focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying cancer.
John’s lab has a particular interest in aggressive malignancies, including cancers of the prostate, colon/rectum, pancreas and ovary, and works closely with Mater clinicians to identify key areas of need in these malignancies, with an ongoing emphasis on the role in cancer of cell surface receptor systems. The lab’s work is underpinned by molecular, enzymology and cell biology approaches, analysis of human tissues and pre-clinical models of cancer to identify cancer promoting molecular pathways and to test new anti-cancer drugs.
Since 2010, John has helped to drive the establishment of gynaecological, urological and breast cancer research teams at the Mater Hospitals. These are closely aligned with Mater’s clinical multidisciplinary teams and involve surgeons, medical oncologists, pathologists, palliative care physicians, nurses and basic researchers.
John is grateful for the more than $6.5 million in research funding that has supported his research from a range of agencies including the National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Mater Foundation, the Australian Research Council, Cancer Council Queensland, the Wesley Research Institute and The Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia.
My research focus on cancer continues to be motivated by an innate drive to understand the aberrant molecular interactions that cause cells to grow, move and survive in settings where they would normally die. My goal is to develop novel therapies that modulate these interactions in such a way that they result in cancer cell death, tumour regression and improved patient survival and quality of life.’

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Prof Trent WoodruffUniversity of Queensland

Dr Woodruff is a Professor of Pharmacology who leads a research team aiming to find new therapeutic treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Current therapies for these diseases are vastly inadequate, and so new research is needed to identify novel targets to slow or halt their progression. Prof Woodruff's specific research revolves around the innate immune system in the brain, and the role of neuroinflammation in propagating disease. A key focus of his current work is testing new drugs developed at the University of Queensland in models of motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as maintaining an active interest in acute inflammatory disorders including sepsis and ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Using a series of potent and orally active complement C5a and NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors developed at UQ, Prof Woodruff's team has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of targeting innate immune-mediated neuroinflammation to reduce neuronal cell death in animal models of these neurodegenerative diseases. His team has recently shown that in addition to their roles in neurodegeneration, innate immune factors also play essential roles in stem and neuronal cell development during embryogenesis, revealing the widespread physiological and pathological roles of this evolutionarily ancient immune system.

trent in a lab smiling at the camera
Prof Trent WoodruffUniversity of Queensland

Dr Woodruff is a Professor of Pharmacology who leads a research team aiming to find new therapeutic treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Current therapies for these diseases are vastly inadequate, and so new research is needed to identify novel targets to slow or halt their progression. Prof Woodruff's specific research revolves around the innate immune system in the brain, and the role of neuroinflammation in propagating disease. A key focus of his current work is testing new drugs developed at the University of Queensland in models of motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as maintaining an active interest in acute inflammatory disorders including sepsis and ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Using a series of potent and orally active complement C5a and NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors developed at UQ, Prof Woodruff's team has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of targeting innate immune-mediated neuroinflammation to reduce neuronal cell death in animal models of these neurodegenerative diseases. His team has recently shown that in addition to their roles in neurodegeneration, innate immune factors also play essential roles in stem and neuronal cell development during embryogenesis, revealing the widespread physiological and pathological roles of this evolutionarily ancient immune system.

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Prof Tanya SmithGriffith University

Dr. Tanya Smith is a Professor in the Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution and the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University. She has previously held a professorship at Harvard University and fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. Professor Smith explores the evolution and development of the human dentition. Teeth preserve remarkably faithful records of daily growth and infant diet - as well as stress experienced during birth - for millions of years. Her research has helped to identify of the origins of a fundamental human adaptation: the costly yet advantageous shift from a “live fast and die young” strategy to the “live slow and grow old” strategy that has helped to make us one of the most successful mammals on the planet. Professor Smith’s research has been funded by the Australian Academy of Sciences and the US National Science Foundation, and published in Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Science Advances. It has been highlighted in the New York Times, National Geographic, Nature, Science, Smithsonian, and Discovery magazines, as well as through American, Australian, British, Canadian, French, German, Irish, New Zealand, and Singaporean broadcast media.

Prof Tanya SmithGriffith University

Dr. Tanya Smith is a Professor in the Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution and the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University. She has previously held a professorship at Harvard University and fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. Professor Smith explores the evolution and development of the human dentition. Teeth preserve remarkably faithful records of daily growth and infant diet - as well as stress experienced during birth - for millions of years. Her research has helped to identify of the origins of a fundamental human adaptation: the costly yet advantageous shift from a “live fast and die young” strategy to the “live slow and grow old” strategy that has helped to make us one of the most successful mammals on the planet. Professor Smith’s research has been funded by the Australian Academy of Sciences and the US National Science Foundation, and published in Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Science Advances. It has been highlighted in the New York Times, National Geographic, Nature, Science, Smithsonian, and Discovery magazines, as well as through American, Australian, British, Canadian, French, German, Irish, New Zealand, and Singaporean broadcast media.

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A/Prof Juliana HamzahHarry Perkins Institute of Medical Research

A/Prof. Juliana Hamzah is the Head of Laboratory Targeted Drug Delivery, Imaging and Therapy at the Harry Perkins Institute, and the appointed head of Institute's Therapeutic Targeting Research Theme. She has over 12 years of research experience in developing targeted delivery technology platforms for imaging and treating diseases including cancer and atherosclerosis. Following the completion of her PhD in 2005, Juliana did her first postdoctoral training at WA Institute of Medical Research (2006-2009) on developing therapies against cancer angiogenesis. She was then recruited to join the Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, California, USA, under the prestigious American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship (2009-2012). She was competitively selected and trained under NIH/NCI sponsored program to perform in vivo imaging of therapeutics. Her current research program (since 2014) focuses on identifying diagnostic and therapeutic overlaps between different types of chronic fibro-inflammatory diseases such as cancer, atherosclerotic disease and liver fibrosis.

A/Prof Juliana HamzahHarry Perkins Institute of Medical Research

A/Prof. Juliana Hamzah is the Head of Laboratory Targeted Drug Delivery, Imaging and Therapy at the Harry Perkins Institute, and the appointed head of Institute's Therapeutic Targeting Research Theme. She has over 12 years of research experience in developing targeted delivery technology platforms for imaging and treating diseases including cancer and atherosclerosis. Following the completion of her PhD in 2005, Juliana did her first postdoctoral training at WA Institute of Medical Research (2006-2009) on developing therapies against cancer angiogenesis. She was then recruited to join the Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, California, USA, under the prestigious American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship (2009-2012). She was competitively selected and trained under NIH/NCI sponsored program to perform in vivo imaging of therapeutics. Her current research program (since 2014) focuses on identifying diagnostic and therapeutic overlaps between different types of chronic fibro-inflammatory diseases such as cancer, atherosclerotic disease and liver fibrosis.

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A/Prof Xiaowei WangBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute

Associate Professor Xiaowei Wang is a cardiovascular researcher interested in using imaging technologies like ultrasound, MRI and CT to identify high-risk plaque in the arteries. She is also interested in developing targeted drug delivery methods without side effects to help people recover after a heart attack. Associate Professor Wang heads the Molecular Imaging and Theranostics laboratory at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, and co-chairs the Atherothrombosis Program.
She was trained as a sonographer for echocardiography prior to her research career; therefore her work has a strong focus on translational cardiovascular research. Associate Professor Wang’s work spans across several scientific fields, including physics, chemistry, biology and biotechnology, and uniquely combines both basic research and translational development of future diagnostic tools to be used in patients. Her research focuses on preclinical molecular imaging across a range of technologies, such as MRI, ultrasound, PET, microCT, fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. Associate Professor Wang has employed these technologies for both diagnostic and theranostic (simultaneous diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of treatment efficacy) purposes. Her other research interests are targeted drug therapy and the use of micro/nanoparticles for targeted delivery of drugs.
Associate Professor Wang has presented her work at numerous conferences. She has been awarded 15 international and 12 national travel grants, 14 Young Investigator Awards and 18 prizes. Associate Professor Wang is also a founding member of the Australian Society of Molecular Imaging (ASMI), established in 2013, and was elected as President. She is the Australian Representative for both the Federation of Asian Societies of Molecular Imaging (FASMI) and the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS). Associate Professor Wang is the President-elect of FASMI and will be President in 2021. She is also a member of the Baker Institute’s Gender Equity and Diversity Committee, Chair of the Institute’s Mentoring Committee, and on the Leadership Committee of the Women in Molecular Imaging Network.

A/Prof Xiaowei WangBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute

Associate Professor Xiaowei Wang is a cardiovascular researcher interested in using imaging technologies like ultrasound, MRI and CT to identify high-risk plaque in the arteries. She is also interested in developing targeted drug delivery methods without side effects to help people recover after a heart attack. Associate Professor Wang heads the Molecular Imaging and Theranostics laboratory at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, and co-chairs the Atherothrombosis Program.
She was trained as a sonographer for echocardiography prior to her research career; therefore her work has a strong focus on translational cardiovascular research. Associate Professor Wang’s work spans across several scientific fields, including physics, chemistry, biology and biotechnology, and uniquely combines both basic research and translational development of future diagnostic tools to be used in patients. Her research focuses on preclinical molecular imaging across a range of technologies, such as MRI, ultrasound, PET, microCT, fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. Associate Professor Wang has employed these technologies for both diagnostic and theranostic (simultaneous diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of treatment efficacy) purposes. Her other research interests are targeted drug therapy and the use of micro/nanoparticles for targeted delivery of drugs.
Associate Professor Wang has presented her work at numerous conferences. She has been awarded 15 international and 12 national travel grants, 14 Young Investigator Awards and 18 prizes. Associate Professor Wang is also a founding member of the Australian Society of Molecular Imaging (ASMI), established in 2013, and was elected as President. She is the Australian Representative for both the Federation of Asian Societies of Molecular Imaging (FASMI) and the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS). Associate Professor Wang is the President-elect of FASMI and will be President in 2021. She is also a member of the Baker Institute’s Gender Equity and Diversity Committee, Chair of the Institute’s Mentoring Committee, and on the Leadership Committee of the Women in Molecular Imaging Network.

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Dr Xiaowen LiangUniversity of Queensland Diamantina Institute

Dr Xiaowen Liang awarded her PhD from The University of Queensland (UQ) in 2015 and received the Dean’s Award for outstanding Research Higher Degree Theses (top 10% of UQ graduates). She is a UQ Development Fellow and the focus of her work is on the use of advanced technologies to improve liver cancer outcomes and in managing drug induced liver injury. She has published a total of 4 book chapters and 46 peer-reviewed articles (7 as first author and 14 as corresponding author) in high-quality journals such as Advanced Science, Theranostics, ACS Nano and Hepatology. She has attracted over $770,000 as CIA including NHMRC New Investigator Project Grant, UQ Development Fellowship, and Global Connection Fund Priming Grant. Currently, she supervises one PhD student and one Honours student as principal supervisor and co-supervises 3 PhD students.

Dr Xiaowen LiangUniversity of Queensland Diamantina Institute

Dr Xiaowen Liang awarded her PhD from The University of Queensland (UQ) in 2015 and received the Dean’s Award for outstanding Research Higher Degree Theses (top 10% of UQ graduates). She is a UQ Development Fellow and the focus of her work is on the use of advanced technologies to improve liver cancer outcomes and in managing drug induced liver injury. She has published a total of 4 book chapters and 46 peer-reviewed articles (7 as first author and 14 as corresponding author) in high-quality journals such as Advanced Science, Theranostics, ACS Nano and Hepatology. She has attracted over $770,000 as CIA including NHMRC New Investigator Project Grant, UQ Development Fellowship, and Global Connection Fund Priming Grant. Currently, she supervises one PhD student and one Honours student as principal supervisor and co-supervises 3 PhD students.

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Dr Trang NguyenUniversity Technology Sydney

Dr Nguyen is a research fellow and lecturer in Biomedical Engineering at University Technology Sydney (UTS) and the ACRF Image-X Institute. She was awarded First Class Honour in Bachelor of Engineering at The University of Queensland in 2010, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy conferred by The University of Sydney in 2015. She currently holds an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) fellowship, a Cancer Institute New South Wales Fellowship and a Cancer Australia grant, totalling $1.2M in funding. Dr Nguyen is the lead physicist in two multi-institutional radiotherapy clinical trials: TROG 15.01 SPARK trial and TROG 17.03 LARK trial.
Dr Nguyen has authored and co-authored 25 high impact research papers in the field of medical physics. Her scientific career to date produced more than 40 journals in total. Two articles were mentioned in the editorials of Radiotherapy and Oncology and became the featured articles of their issues.

Dr Trang NguyenUniversity Technology Sydney

Dr Nguyen is a research fellow and lecturer in Biomedical Engineering at University Technology Sydney (UTS) and the ACRF Image-X Institute. She was awarded First Class Honour in Bachelor of Engineering at The University of Queensland in 2010, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy conferred by The University of Sydney in 2015. She currently holds an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) fellowship, a Cancer Institute New South Wales Fellowship and a Cancer Australia grant, totalling $1.2M in funding. Dr Nguyen is the lead physicist in two multi-institutional radiotherapy clinical trials: TROG 15.01 SPARK trial and TROG 17.03 LARK trial.
Dr Nguyen has authored and co-authored 25 high impact research papers in the field of medical physics. Her scientific career to date produced more than 40 journals in total. Two articles were mentioned in the editorials of Radiotherapy and Oncology and became the featured articles of their issues.

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Dr Tushar KumeriaUniversity of New South Wales

I, Dr. Tushar Kumeria, am a Scientia Senior Lecturer and an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellow (ECF) at the School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia. I have co-authored 70 high impact journal publications in top-tier journals in the field of nanomaterials, biomaterials, drug delivery, and sensing. My work has attracted more than 1900 citations on Scopus and returns an H-index of 26. I completed my Ph.D. in 2015 from the University of Adelaide with a Doctoral Thesis Medal and Dean’s Commendation Letter. After that, I spent two years at the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) as a postdoc in Prof. M. J. Sailor’s lab. In 2017, I returned to Australia to the School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland (UQ) as UQ Development Fellow and transitioned to my NHMRC ECF soon after as an independent researcher leader. I have received research grants of over AU$2.1 million (AU$1.4 M as Lead Investigator) from various competitive sources. My research expertise lies in porous materials and their composite for biomedical applications with a focus on:
Porous materials-based drug delivery systems for efficient and targeted delivery.
Porous materials/Polymer composite scaffolds and implants for tissue engineering
Porous photonic crystals-based point-of-care sensors for diagnostics and environmental applications.

Dr Tushar KumeriaUniversity of New South Wales

I, Dr. Tushar Kumeria, am a Scientia Senior Lecturer and an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellow (ECF) at the School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia. I have co-authored 70 high impact journal publications in top-tier journals in the field of nanomaterials, biomaterials, drug delivery, and sensing. My work has attracted more than 1900 citations on Scopus and returns an H-index of 26. I completed my Ph.D. in 2015 from the University of Adelaide with a Doctoral Thesis Medal and Dean’s Commendation Letter. After that, I spent two years at the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) as a postdoc in Prof. M. J. Sailor’s lab. In 2017, I returned to Australia to the School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland (UQ) as UQ Development Fellow and transitioned to my NHMRC ECF soon after as an independent researcher leader. I have received research grants of over AU$2.1 million (AU$1.4 M as Lead Investigator) from various competitive sources. My research expertise lies in porous materials and their composite for biomedical applications with a focus on:
Porous materials-based drug delivery systems for efficient and targeted delivery.
Porous materials/Polymer composite scaffolds and implants for tissue engineering
Porous photonic crystals-based point-of-care sensors for diagnostics and environmental applications.

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